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Ford unveils FVision electric and autonomous truck concept

Source: Charge Forward Ford’s Turkish truck subsidiary has unveiled a new electric and autonomous truck concept, F-Vision, at the IAA Commercial Vehicles 2018 show in Hannover, Germany today. more…The post Ford unveils F-Vision electric and autonomous truck concept appeared first on Electrek.

Dana acquires SME Group to expand electrified product portfolio

first_imgSource: Dana Automotive supplier Dana has announced the acquisition of SME Group, an Italy-based manufacturer of motors, inverters and controls for off-highway electrified vehicle applications.SME’s low-voltage motors and inverters target the electrification of off-highway equipment for applications including agriculture, automated guided vehicles, construction, and material handling. The acquisition will expand Dana’s portfolio of electrified products.“Dana’s acquisition of SME enhances our ability to address the electrification and hybridization needs of our customers, while also increasing the potential for incremental content per vehicle,” said Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas. “SME’s exceptional electric motor and inverter products, which largely support off-highway applications, are highly complementary to the technologies we acquired with TM4, which are predominately focused on light- and commercial-vehicle applications.”Dana is also anticipated to acquire the Drive Systems segment of the Oerlikon group in the first quarter of 2019. Source: Electric Vehicles Magazinelast_img read more

XPENG Teases New P7 Electric Coupe Ahead Of Auto Shanghai Debut

first_imgThe startup said when the P7 spy shots were exposed, the new model, powered by Xavier, NVIDIA’s AI supercomputing system-on-chip (SoC), will offer premium styling and a significant performance boost. Besides, such key style points – wide wheelbase, short front overhang, frameless doors, concealed door handles, panoramic windshields – will enhance its coupe silhouette, reinforcing its dynamic balance of speed and elegance.The new coupe is on target for commercial launch at the end of 2019, XPENG Motors revealed.The EV maker officially launched its first commercial model, the XPENG G3, in last December. With the fast expansion of the capacity at the vehicle plant co-built by the startup and Haima Automobile, XPENG Motors has started the scale delivery of the G3 SUVs at the end of March, and plans to hand over 10,000 vehicles at the end of July and a total of 40,000 vehicles in this year.Source: Gasgoo Xpeng Motors To Unveil Its Second Electric Car In April Source: Electric Vehicle News What’s New At China’s Xpeng Motors? Lots Of EV Happenings XPeng Motors Installs 30 Fast-Charging Stations In One Day XPENG expands EV offering.Chinese EV startup XPENG Motors will unveil at Auto Shanghai 2019 a new all-electric coupe dubbed P7 (internally code-named E28) that features the startup’s in-house next-generation autonomous driving and intelligent-connected technologies.According to photos released by the startup, we can see that the P7 adopts a concise front face devoid of grille, which is typically applied in all-electric vehicles. Above the split-type headlights, a slim light bar stretches across the front face, creating a wider visual effect. As to the side profile, the new vehicle carries concealed door handles that help reduce air resistance. The fastback design and the ducktail spoiler for the rear end makes the visual center of gravity move backward horizontally.More EV News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 9, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

The Time Has Finally Come Electric Car Ads Are On TV

first_imgIt was only a matter of time. Now, we just need many, many more.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

64 kWh Kia eSoul First Edition In UK Starts From £33795

first_imgDeliveries are expected to begin in Q1 2020Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

Lets revolt against Lucremores ludicracy

first_img Facebook Soccer 50 Russell Brand Share via Email Email (optional) Share on Facebook Sportblog Share on Facebook soporific Comments 28 ‘Ultimately, though, this is not football’s problem; we live in a consumer capitalist society, look out your window – that’s consumer capitalism out there, as far as the eye can see. If it annoys you then we’ll have to have a revolution, which I’m well up for.’Wrote this one for free then Russell, did ya? All proceeds from the booky wook going towards funding the revolution? Reply Soccer Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Well, the Guardian is not a for profit organization at least, so it’s not like if you were writing for Rupert Murdoch, Russell.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Guardian#OwnershipGood article. Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Twitter Share on Twitter 9 Feb 2008 19:03 Shares00 0 1 Share | Pick What’s the point?If it isn’t this, it will be some other outrage to sportsmanship. The Champions League was already a joke before losing in it transferred a team to the UEFA Cup, making it not only a joke, but a disgrace. The Premier League has merely succeeded in removing any sense of competition from the English top flight. You have to wonder if this stuff isn’t some secret FA plot to increase attendances at lower division clubs.If you want to watch decent, competitive football, support a team in the Championship. Just take a year off if they get promoted as they’ll likely be straight down the next season. I stopped watching European football nearly a decade ago, because it was so obviously designed to limit sporting competition and to protect investments. I haven’t watched a Premier League game where my team wasn’t playing for the past few seasons (not that any club outside of the big 4 has a chance to win anyway). My team are now so awful that I can’t stand watching the overpaid clowns any more (after 30 years). Loyalty has kept me hanging on, but I think this season is the last. I don’t like what this league has become, or the “fans” it has attracted, and I’m not alone. In contrast, the NHL is well-organized and the draft system and salary cap provides a decent level of competition so that the powerful teams don’t win every year. I’m glad I discovered hockey before I got completely fed up of English football. Beautiful game run by ugly people. | Pick Facebook Reply 9 Feb 2008 12:58 View more comments Reply why does this idiot get space in the Guardian? Share on Facebook expanded Turning down a million squid, calling for the revolution and wintering in the Caribbean – I fear the Russell brand of humour will soon be inaccessible to the masses.Comedians, like football and journalism, all too easily become isolated from their Muse. Don’t worry though, mate. I’m sure there is a rich vein of humour to be mined from the emotionless world you seem to frequent.I do hope you can stay relevant Russ. The last thing we need is another airy-fairy bubble in the sky. 0 1 Twitter comment yosemite Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Facebook Facebook Share Share on Facebook Share on Messenger 9 Feb 2008 18:09 Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Facebook Report 0 1 Twitter 0 1 Report Twitter Reply chuckw Share on Twitter Report Facebook Facebook brand response figures show russell would be perfect for selling skodas 0 1 tommitourbus Facebook SexWasp Share Share Reply Share on Facebook SolomonGrundy Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick fishnetgrenade Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Facebook Reply | Pick Reply Twitter Order by oldest Report | Pick Share on Twitter Sportblog Share on Twitter Twitter Facebook Reply Topics unthreaded Facebook 0 1 Facebook | Pick | Pick | Pick Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Fri 8 Feb 2008 19.10 EST Share Twitter Share on Twitter 0 1 0 1 1 Reuse this content,View all comments > | Pick 9 Feb 2008 20:07 Facebook | Pick OrenthalLopez Russel, when are you going to come on the football weekly pod? You would be fantastic! All Share on Facebook 9 Feb 2008 13:49 Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 0 1 Report Report 9 Feb 2008 14:04 sciacca Facebook 0 1 Share This comment, and those referring to it, deleted by moderator Twitter Share ThrobbingRabona NonEdibleNacho Share newest Share 0 1 Twitter Facebook Share | Pick Vurtnz 0 1 25 | Pick Report Report Reply 0 1 Twitter Reply amen brother | Pick 9 Feb 2008 19:33 Share on Facebook 0 1 Share comments (28)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. bringbackzola 9 Feb 2008 15:20 Share on WhatsApp …surely its time for all fans to threaten to start organizing and coordinate mass boycotts of a weekend’s round of games…tv may bring in revenues, but empty stadiums will not bring viewers……on a random note, am in dhaka, and last nite whilst channel hopping happened upon a korean satellite channel that was showing highlights of the 2007 royal variety performance…am still giggling from ur courtly performance… | Pick A million quid…for one advert? jeez…. Share on Twitter Reply Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Share on Twitter Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter Twitter 10 Feb 2008 4:12 Share on Pinterest Report Someone who works on Big Brother moans about naked greed and over-hyped barrel-scraping. That’s funny. Let’s revolt against Lucre-more’s ludicracy 9 Feb 2008 18:17 | Pick Share on Twitter Share Report Report This could only be a boon to the English game if Boro played Sunderland in the Kalahari and the fans from the North East were given one way tickets……and KK could referee?? Reply 0 1 Reply 9 Feb 2008 17:17 Share on Twitter Facebook Threads collapsed Share on Twitter | Pick I’m in Antigua in the Caribbean inhaling limitless beauty and enjoying the unstudied benevolence of the people who live here. Fred, a friendly bloke who works at the hotel and laughs at me or with me – I hope it’s the latter, it doesn’t do to be presumptuous – took me and my young consort to watch the Caribbean Twenty20 cricket tournament currently in full swing on the island. Cricket is obviously very popular here and this new variation on the formula has taken the West Indies by storm.I don’t know much about cricket; my knowledge was mostly gleaned from a BBC drama called Bodyline, which recounted the Douglas Jardine versus Donald Bradman Ashes series, which must’ve been in the early 30s. Good it was. The trick was to throw the ball at the batsman instead of the wicket, which really spiced things up and I think it ought be reinstated nowadays or perhaps bowlers should be given pistols and shoot batsman as soon as the match starts making the game even shorter, which I think would be a blessing.The other thing I know about cricket is from them adverts where Ian Botham and Allan Lamb advertise chops because both their names have “meat” connotations – Beefy Botham and, well, lamb. The whole silly business made my vegetarianism seem all the more brilliant. The two of ’em scoffing down lumps of flesh, fat and rind between their gnashers going all rancid made me think meat is not only murder – it’s also halitosis.This Twenty20 caper was a pleasant enough evening mostly because of the jubilant carnival conducted throughout the match (Dominica versus Barbados) – often the celebrations were entirely divorced from the on-pitch action. I saw one group of women gleefully gyrate and high-five when Barbados got “a four” and then repeat the ecstatic ritual when the same batsman was bowled out minutes later.This tournament was devised by a Texan businessman who himself had little knowledge of cricket. He owns the stadium and the TV rights as well as having a lot of other commercial interests on the island. Clearly this man had motivations outside of altruism, business people always do. It’s how they define themselves – “Hello, I’m a businessman.” They say.This globe-trotting soccer circus proposed by Richard Scudamore (I’m suggesting Lucre-more, if anyone wants it, they must credit me) damned by Harry Redknapp as “unnatural” and Gareth Southgate as an “April fool” is another decision by the Premier League that does not have the interest of fans at heart. This is not surprising though is it? They are, once more, business people. They want to make as much money as possible whilst not actually appearing to be living incarnations of Satan. It must be a constant exercise in brinkmanship.The idea of introducing 10 more games decided at random, with the exception that five top seeds will avoid each other, as Lucre-more points out “imbalances symmetry” as if he’s a graphic designer and the fixture list is a logo for a firm of masseuses who specialise in oily hand-jobs.It’s not that the idea is inherently evil, people in Beijing or Sydney or whatever would get the thrill of live English football, which is nice for them. I suppose what is offensive is that this idea exposes the naked commercialism that drives “our” national game. Which may soon not be exclusively “our” national game because Reading versus Bolton will be held on the seabed of the Cape of Good Hope.Ultimately, though, this is not football’s problem; we live in a consumer capitalist society, look out your window – that’s consumer capitalism out there, as far as the eye can see. If it annoys you then we’ll have to have a revolution, which I’m well up for. It doesn’t matter if Hillary wins or Obama or McCain so let’s stop getting excited about people’s genitals, pigmentation and age; they are all tools of the consumer capitalist system that we tolerate and endorse with our apathy.It will only get worse, they will always want more money, it’s the nature of the beast, except it’s not a beast, it’s a machine, a machine designed to take our money and shut our mouths. The other day I was offered a million quid to do a car commercial, I turned it down because I know that once you take that money they own you.One could argue that by working for this paper or British TV or companies like Universal I’m already compromised and that’s indubitably true. But this is the context we all live in and presently fundamentalism is beyond me. The possibility for change however is perpetual; they can change the Premier League but we can change the world. As long as corporately owned sports are elevated to carnivals by the people that attend them we have hope. Share on Facebook Murdoch…. come out wherever you are.This is all your doing. And to think I once watched Wimbledon v Everton at Selhurst with barely 4000 fans. Facebook Report Paddymac Share tomwolfe Share via Email Share on Twitter Share Share on Twitter Report Share Share Share on Twitter Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Share on Twitter Liked this Russell. I guess you must famous or something, i just thought you were a west ham supporter – the joy of ‘ball – all equal in the stands!liked this line: “Reading versus Bolton will be held on the seabed of the Cape of Good Hope”, but i’d say that under the seabed of the Cape Horn would be more appropriate. 9 Feb 2008 15:21 Share Share on Twitter Twitter Reason (optional) Report Close report comment form 9 Feb 2008 11:24 Reply 9 Feb 2008 14:44 Twitter Share Share on Twitter Share Report graff200 0 1 Share on Twitter | Pick Report Reply I live in Australia (Byron Bay) and although I see the complaints form ;proper fans’ I would love to be able to see my beloved Chelse live instead of on the bo. Sorry, but the A league is still crpa and I barely ever watch it cuase I’m spoiled by the EPL! But I’m with our Russell — viva la revolution! 9 Feb 2008 22:19 Share And, er, he’s not very honest is he? Do we believe what he writes any more than we believe the other things he gets up to? while not a fan of violence and hatred, in the history of republics, it has its place. the premiership has been built upon the longstanding history of local rivalry and pride infused with running battles amongst supporters. we all know that sex and violence sell and it is part of the draw to an american viewer watching english football to imagine the madness and passion that accompany a sporting event attended by bloodthirsty and violent bands of supporters traveling to the ground of a hated rival. the premiership has already watered down its mad and passionate game and exporting matches to neutral grounds will only exacerbate the problem. football in america is not on par with english football precisely because there is no passionate support for any team, and this is not only limited to football. american sports are corporate events and even regular season games in american football, basketball, baseball, and hockey are tantamount to exibition matches. only in world football is the need to succeed in every match a dire need. these added matches outside the country will only succeed in watering down the sport creating a similar-to-american-sports exibitionary nature. if the supporters of football in england are being robbed perhaps violent revolution is the answer. attack the money. eat the rich. give the game back to the people who have built it over more than a century. the moneyed owners of football teams (ie-chelsea, man city, liverpool, man u) have never had a problem feeding off the blood of its sacraficial lambs. maybe they need to become the lambs now, they are definitely fat enough. | Pick Share Facebook Reply Share on Twitter 0 1 Share on Facebook oldest 9 Feb 2008 16:54 A celebrity who actually realises that he can afford to have morals. I applaud you for turning down the advert, I would have done it for £1000. I shall be ‘bigging you up’ in the pub tonight so if you ever try selling me credit whilst Im watching daytime TV……………….. Share on Facebook Reply collapsed Twitter | Pick Report Twitter Reply Reply 2 0 1 Twitter Report Twitter 0 1 9 Feb 2008 11:54 Seriously Russell, i would totally change sexual orientation just so i could have the chance of being your toy boy and inspire you to mention how rotten capitalism is more often.As it is you mention it quite regularly and for this i am recommending you for a ‘Hero of the Revolution’ medal or whatever commemorative thingamejigs we’re going to give out in recognition for those who knew and did something about it before everyone else.”Businessmen: they want to make as much money as possible whilst not actually appearing to be living incarnations of Satan. It must be a constant exercise in brinkmanship.” – Russell Brand.Totally brilliant. Very pithy i must say. Someone should submit the above to a collection a famous quotes, it would fit right in.Russell, more of the same please! Share on Facebook Twitter Report TogoPresley Report So how do we revolt then Russell? The administrators of our game aren’t going to do anything whilst these shysters plot. The naked greed of this circus is sickening yet the media lap it up as always. Wenger’s Arsenal apparently have 90% of their fans overseas – that’s why they’re doing it, although what impact a one-off gettogether of 30,000 Malasians Gunners makes on that 90% is anyone’s guess. Birmingham City want the money so they can “all unilaterally” (sic) reduce ticket prices and invest in community schemes. Putting aside the obvious, that as a likely Championship team they won’t be travelling to Korea or wherever – one has to ask what exactly have they been doing with the extra money from Sky this year – it hasn’t made much of a dent in the £55 they charged some away fans. I hope their community-schemes aren’t holding their breath waiting for this ill-gotten loot to arrive. As an ex-match going United fan, I knew the price of paying for Malcolm Glazer’s loans was going to land sooner or later – what I never bargained for was that the price would be the remaining integrity of the competition itself. The 39th game is an insult to any self-respecting fan. It’s a desperate claw-back by a sub-prime organisation that is vastly over-exposed. If they were interested in their future they would be looking at the depleting quality and quantity of home-grown talent and the ageing of its watching public, not engaging in winter cash-dashes. Will the last one out please turn off the floodlights. Facebook bringbackzola Report Share on Twitter Reply Share on Facebook Russell Brand, most virtuously verbose of celebs, I will join your revolution. I will blow cocaine up the ass of pimp-daddy Scudamore and play keepie-uppy with his balls whilst the hordes of “EPL” “fans” in Bangkok cheer at the magnificent entertainment. smifee Twitter Share 9 Feb 2008 22:25 0 1 Strangebrew 9 Feb 2008 16:14 Share on Twitter It could work if they seeded it so the top club played the bottom club, the 2nd club played the 19th, the third the 18th and so on. The point being that in theory all the top clubs would get 3 points, the bottom none and the middle clubs on average would draw. Obviously there would be anomalies (sic) but in theory this kind of seeding would have a minimal effect on the title run in and the relagation battle. Your essentially offering all the clubs free points. The ‘winners’ will take them. I think matches abroad is a great idea. What a great weekend of viewing it could be! Show 25 shampagne bollyta Facebook Facebook Share Report 9 Feb 2008 23:02 Share on Facebook recommendations Twitter Report We have the A-League here in Australia and we don’t want the Premier League coming here and syphoning money out of our football economy. It’s limited enough as it is without you money grubbing bastards pilfering what little we have. Report | Pick Share on Facebook Twitter 0 1 | Pick Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook 9 Feb 2008 13:34 | Pick Twitter 1 Share on Twitter Twitter 9 Feb 2008 12:39 Twitter First published on Fri 8 Feb 2008 19.10 EST 100 Facebook Facebook Loading comments… Trouble loading? | Pick | Pick donwendyagain Reply 0 1 9 Feb 2008 14:12 Facebook 9 Feb 2008 11:18 Report Reply Reply poltourist Share on Facebook Facebook Report 2 0 1 Share on Facebook 9 Feb 2008 23:27 Reply Share on Facebook Good article. I’m in no position to criticise or patronise but your articles seem to have got more perceptive and more likely to nail the point.The away games idea is so full of holes it can’t possibly survive. Once again the blazers have shown that their stupidity is only slightly outmatched by their greed.Russell, about that car commercial: when I was around your age I was frequently, seriously mistaken for Marc Bolan out of T-Rex (this was at a time when T-Rex were white hot). Now I’d be lucky to be mistaken for Minty out of Eastenders. Looks don’t last. Think about that next time you get offered a million quid for an advert and take it! Reply HenryLloydMoonlast_img read more

Once Again Rebooting A LongStanding FCPA Proposal This Time In The Aftermath

first_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. Again, the proposal is this: when a company voluntarily discloses an FCPA internal investigation to the DOJ and/or SEC and when one or both of the enforcement agencies do not bring an enforcement action, have the “declining” enforcement agency publicly state, in a thorough and transparent manner, the facts the company disclosed and why the “declining” agency did not bring an enforcement action based on those facts.If the FCPA enforcement agencies are sincere about transparency in their FCPA enforcement programs as officials frequently mention the public (not to mention MTS shareholders who shelled out millions if this instance of FCPA scrutiny followed the typical path) have a right to know the facts the company disclosed and why the “declining” agency did not bring an enforcement action based on those facts.Here is why the proposal makes sense and is in the public interest.For starters (as I first wrote in 2010 and even more relevant today), the DOJ and the SEC are already wildly enthusiastic when it comes to talking about FCPA issues. Enforcement attorneys from both agencies are frequent participants on the FCPA conference circuit and there seems to be no other single law that is the focus of more DOJ or SEC speeches than the FCPA. Thus, there is clearly enthusiasm and ambition at both agencies when it comes to the FCPA.Further (as I first wrote in 2010 and even more relevant today), both the DOJ and the SEC have the resources to accomplish this task. Both agencies have touted the increased FCPA resources in their respective offices and the new personnel hired to focus on the FCPA. Combine enthusiasm and ambition with sufficient resources and personnel and the proposal certainly seems doable considering that there are likely less than 10 relevant examples per year.In addition, the DOJ is already used to this type of exercise. It is called the FCPA Opinion Procedure Release (see here), a process the DOJ frequently urges those subject to the FCPA to utilize. Under the Opinion Procedure regulations, an issuer or domestic concern subject to the FCPA can voluntarily disclose prospective business conduct to the DOJ which then has 30 days to respond to the request by issuing an opinion that states whether the prospective conduct would, for purposes of the DOJ’s present enforcement policy, violate the FCPA. The DOJ’s opinions are publicly released and the FCPA bar and the rest of FCPA Inc. study these opinions in advising clients largely because of the general lack of substantive FCPA case law.If the DOJ is able to issue an enforcement opinion as to voluntarily disclosed prospective conduct there seems to be no principled reason why the enforcement agencies could not issue a non-enforcement opinion as to voluntarily disclosed actual conduct. If the enforcement agencies are sincere about providing guidance on the FCPA, as they presumably are, such agency opinions would seem to provide an ideal platform to accomplish such a purpose.Requiring the enforcement agencies to disclose non-enforcement decisions after a voluntary disclosure could also inject some much needed discipline into the voluntary disclosure decision itself – a decision which seems to be reflexive in many instances any time facts suggest the FCPA may be implicated. For instance, MTS’s initial disclosure referred to “possible violations of Company policy, corresponding internal control issues and any possible violations of applicable law, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.” Why a company would disclose “possible” violations is beyond me, but then again see this prior post for the important voluntary disclosure decision and the role of FCPA counsel.Notwithstanding the presence of significant conflicting incentives to do otherwise, it is hoped that FCPA counsel would advise clients to disclose only if a reasonably certain legal conclusion has been reached that the conduct at issue actually violates the FCPA. Accepting this assumption, transparency in FCPA enforcement would be enhanced if the public learned why the enforcement agencies, in the face of a voluntary disclosure, presumably disagreed with the company’s conclusion as informed by FCPA counsel. If the enforcement agencies agreed with the conclusion that the FCPA was violated, but decided not to bring an enforcement action, transparency in FCPA enforcement would similarly be enhanced if the public learned why.A final reason in support of the proposal is that it would give the disclosing companies (and others similarly situated) a benefit by contributing to the mix of public information about the FCPA.In most cases, companies spend millions of dollars investigating conduct that may implicate the FCPA and on the voluntary disclosure process. When the enforcement agencies decline an enforcement action, presumably because the FCPA was not violated, these costs are forever sunk and company shareholders can legitimately ask why it just spent millions investigating and disclosing conduct that the DOJ and the SEC did not conclude violated the FCPA.However, if the enforcement agencies were required to publicly justify their declination decision, the company would achieve, however small, a return on its investment and contribute to the mix of public information about the FCPA – a law which the company will remain subject to long after its voluntary disclosure and long after the enforcement agencies declination decision. Thus, the company, the company’s industry peers, and indeed all those subject to the FCPA would benefit by learning more about the DOJ and the SEC’s enforcement conclusions.Transparency, accountability, useful guidance, a return on investment.All would be accomplished by requiring the enforcement agencies to publicly justify a declination decision in instances where no enforcement action follows a voluntary disclosure.All points to ponder … until the next time I write this same general post. Learn More & Register This post two weeks ago addressed the same topic as today’s post and quite frankly I am growing tired of writing this same general post for what seems like the umpteenth time. However, until things change I will keep writing it which means I will probably keep writing this same general post long into the future.The proposal is this: when a company voluntarily discloses an FCPA internal investigation to the DOJ and/or SEC and when one or both of the enforcement agencies do not bring an enforcement action, have the “declining” enforcement agency publicly state, in a thorough and transparent manner, the facts the company disclosed and why the “declining” agency did not bring an enforcement action based on those facts.As highlighted in this March 2012 post, Minnesota-based MTS Systems Corp., a global supplier of test systems and industrial position sensors, disclosed:“MTS Systems Corporation (the “Company”) is investigating certain gift, travel, entertainment and other expenses that may have been improperly incurred in connection with some of the Company’s operations in the Asia Pacific region.  The investigation has focused on possible violations of Company policy, corresponding internal control issues and any possible violations of applicable law, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.  Though the investigation is not complete, the Company has taken remedial actions, including changes to internal control procedures and removing certain persons formerly employed in its Korea office. The Company believes, however, that the amount of the expenses in question is not material to its reported consolidated financial statements. The Company has voluntarily disclosed this matter to the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  Additionally, the Company has disclosed this matter to the U.S. Air Force pursuant to its Administrative Agreement.  The Company cannot predict the outcome of this matter at this time or whether it will have a materially adverse impact on its business prospects, financial condition, operating results or cash flows.”Like other instances of FCPA scrutiny, the company remained under FCPA scrutiny for years and as highlighted in this December 2016 post the company disclosed:“As previously reported by us with disclosures starting in March 2012, we investigated certain gift, travel, entertainment and other expenses incurred in connection with some of our operations in the Asia-Pacific region. This investigation focused on possible violations of Company policy, corresponding internal control issues and possible violations of applicable law, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Substantial investigative work was completed on this matter and we took remedial actions, including changes to internal control procedures and removing certain persons formerly employed in our South Korea office. We voluntarily disclosed this matter to the Department of Justice and the SEC (the Agencies). We presented the results of our investigation and our corrective actions to representatives of the Agencies on January 16, 2013. We also investigated certain business practices in China. The investigation had a similar focus to the prior investigation described above. We have updated the Agencies regarding the China investigation and we took certain initial remedial actions, including changes to internal control procedures and removing certain persons formerly employed in our China business. We cannot predict the outcome of the matters described in this paragraph at this time or whether these matters will have a material adverse impact on our business prospects, financial condition, operating results or cash flows.”As noted in the December 2016 post, at the same the company disclosed:“that it has initiated an internal investigation into apparent violations of the company’s code of conduct involving certain employees in its China operations and this investigation will delay the issuance of its fourth quarter and full year earnings as well as the filing of the company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for fiscal 2016.”[…]“Regarding the internal investigation that has delayed the filing of our Annual Report and earnings release, we are deeply disappointed to report that we recently discovered that certain individuals in our leadership in China appear to have violated MTS’s code of conduct, including association with an independent business that may compete with MTS in certain markets. Given the level of the MTS personnel in China who appear to have violated our code of conduct, the filing of our Annual Report on Form 10-K and our earnings release will be delayed until the internal investigation has been completed and its findings evaluated.”[…]“The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of MTS has engaged independent external counsel in connection with the ongoing internal investigation and will assess the impact on the company’s financial inputs from China and review for potential violations of law. MTS has already begun taking certain remedial measures in response to this situation.”Summing this all up, MTS Systems voluntarily disclosed problematic conduct regarding the company’s operations in the Asia Pacific Region, removed certain persons formerly employed in its South Korea office, voluntarily disclosed additional problematic conduct concerning certain business practices in China, removed certain persons formerly employed in its China business, initiated another internal investigations into apparent violations of the company’s code of conduct involving certain employees in its China operations, and discovered that “certain individuals in [it’s] leadership in China appeared to have violated [its code of conduct], and given the “level of MTS personnel in China who appear to have violated [its] code of conduct, delayed filing its annual report.Earlier this week, MTS Systems disclosed:“As previously reported by us with disclosures starting in March 2012, we investigated certain gift, travel, entertainment and other expenses incurred in connection with some of our operations in the Asia Pacific region. This investigation focused on possible violations of Company policy, corresponding internal control issues and possible violations of applicable law, including the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Substantial investigative work was completed on this matter and we implemented remedial measures, including changes to internal control procedures and removing certain persons formerly employed in our Korea office. We voluntarily disclosed this matter to the Department of Justice and the SEC (the Agencies). We also investigated certain business practices in China, starting in 2014 and that investigation had a similar focus to the 2012 investigation described above. We have also updated the Agencies regarding the China investigation described in the Internal Investigation Related to China Operations above. We were notified by the Agencies in August 2017 that their respective investigations were closed as to MTS without further action taken by either agency. With the closure of the government investigations by the Agencies and the steps being taken by the Company voluntarily, we believe that the matter has been resolved. We are committed to continuing to monitor compliance with the Company’s Code of Conduct policy and applicable law.”Regarding the other issue, the company disclosed: “As previously reported by us, in November 2016, after the end of fiscal year 2016, we initiated an internal investigation into apparent violations of our Code of Conduct involving certain employees in our China operations, including association by those employees with an independent business that may compete with us in certain markets. As the apparent violations implicated members of leadership in our China operations, the Audit Committee engaged independent external counsel to conduct an investigation of our China operations in order to assess the impact of these apparent violations on the Company’s financial input from China and to review for potential violations the Company’s Code of Conduct, anticorruption compliance policies and procedures and related U.S. law. Independent forensic accountants, acting at the direction of external counsel, performed testing of certain transactions related to our China operations as part of this investigation.As of March 2017, substantial investigative work was completed. The investigation through March 2017 confirmed that the former China Test leader and several other former senior managers associated with our China Test operations violated the conflict of interest provisions of the MTS Code of Conduct in connection with their involvement with an independent business that competed with the Company’s low-end products in the China market. This inconsistent adherence to the Company’s Code of Conduct could have resulted in management override of internal control over financial reporting.In light of, and to address the findings of the investigation, and to remediate the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting resulting from the conclusion described in the prior paragraph, we will conduct more robust monitoring to ensure adherence to our Code of Conduct. Additionally, we have identified opportunities to meaningfully enhance our processes and controls related to the adherence with our compliance policies and procedures, and we will be particularly focused on enhancing our third-party intermediary diligence, engagement and monitoring processes, with the support of and guidance from external resources, and continued clear and consistent messaging on compliance expectations at all levels of the organization.To address the challenges presented by the findings of the investigation of our China operations, we are exploring multiple business alternatives to address the low-end materials market. The consideration of these alternatives could possibly result in a future expectation of sale or disposal of certain assets that could cause an impairment charge to be recognized in a subsequent period. As of July 1, 2017, we do not anticipate any material impairment charges for the tangible and intangible assets. We are prepared to assess the mix of products, markets in which we compete and manner by which we select and utilize resellers, agents, consultants and vendors to support these commitments. We have begun implementing measures to strengthen our compliance program and monitoring to ensure adherence to our Code of Conduct.”last_img read more

SCOTX SA School Teacher Bullied Not Sexually Harassed Case Closed

first_img Username The Texas Supreme Court ruled Friday invalid a complaint of same-sex sexual harassment. The behavior, which involved two female middle school teachers, was not shown the be motivated by sexual desire. Critics say the decision undermines the rights of workers at an important moment of social awareness. Janet Elliott has the details in The Texas Lawbook.You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password? Passwordcenter_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

SCOTX On Retained Acreage Conflicts Lawful Contracts Rule

first_img Password Lost your password? Remember me Usernamecenter_img In two closely-watched cases decided Friday, SCOTX defended its seemingly conflicting views on state regulation of retained acreage. Chief Justice Nathan Hecht says it’s actually pretty simple: contracts mean what they say. Janet Elliott explains in The Texas Lawbook.You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

Sexuality essentially silenced following stroke

first_img Source:https://us.sagepub.com/ Stroke is one of Australia’s biggest killers and a leading cause of disability In 2017 there were more than 56,000 new and recurrent strokes – that is one stroke every nine minutes. Around 30 percent of stroke survivors are of working age (under the age of 65). 65 percent of stroke survivors suffer a disability which impedes their ability to carry out daily living activities unassisted. Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Stroke survivors and their partners are not adequately supported to deal with changes to their relationships, self-identity, gender roles and intimacy following stroke, according to new research from the University of Sydney.Published today in Clinical Rehabilitation, the qualitative study found that stroke survivors struggle to openly discuss sexuality, and health professionals rarely address the topic during rehabilitation.This finding is supported by data from the Stroke Foundation showing as few as 15 percent of patients receive information on intimate relations post-stroke, despite clinical guideline recommendations.Lead author Dr Margaret McGrath from the University of Sydney said the new review shows that sexuality is essentially silenced following stroke.”Issues around post-stroke sexuality and where to seek support are rarely discussed with stroke survivors or their loved ones despite numerous interactions with medical, rehabilitation and counselling staff,” said Dr McGrath, a researcher in occupational therapy from the Faculty of Health Sciences.”Sexuality and disability is viewed as a taboo topic so stroke survivors don’t know how to talk about it and health professionals don’t ask the questions.””This is problematic as sexuality, which includes so much more than just sex, is an essential part of human experience and strongly with linked with emotional and mental health.””But that (stroke) doesn’t change the essence of who I am or what I want before and after. It only changes what I can do. It doesn’t change what I want.” – Stroke survivorThe systematic review collated several studies to explore the experiences of almost 650 male and female stroke survivors ranging from 20 to 105 years of age, as well as the experiences of 283 partners.Using a broad definition of sexuality, the study explores dimensions such as gender roles and identity, presentation of self to others, sexual expression, intimacy, relationships and reproduction.For couples in a relationship before stroke, physical and cognitive impairment, communication difficulties and post-stroke fatigue meant that pre-existing, often stereotyped gender-based roles, needed to change.Related StoriesStem cell stimulation shows promise as potential stroke treatmentStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesNew discovery may explain some forms of stroke”Men often struggled with an inability to be what they viewed as a ‘protector’ or ‘provider’ for the family, while female stroke survivors lamented a loss of their role as wife, mother or homemaker – all of which affects the way they interact with each other” said Dr McGrath.”This also impacts partners’ self-identity, particularly when they moved from being an intimate partner to a primary caregiver.”For people not in a relationship or whose relationship ended, stroke decreased their self-confidence and willingness to seek out new relationships.”Stroke also impacted the survivor’s relationship with their own body, with many seeing their body as unpredictable or separate from themselves. Being sexually intimate exacerbates these feelings, leading to heightened levels of anxiety.”Dr McGrath said many of these fears and misconceptions could be addressed through proper support from health and rehabilitation professionals.”Health professionals’ reluctance to address sexuality is due to a lack of knowledge and confidence. We need tailored education and training to address this knowledge gap.”Under funding from the Stroke Foundation, the University of Sydney is developing programs to address sexuality with stroke survivors. Stroke survivors or partners interested in finding out more can contact Dr McGrath.Facts about stroke:last_img read more

For shark scientists Shark Week is a blessing and a curse

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img There’s little question that television viewers look forward to the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” programming about the toothy creatures—this week’s opening lineup drew nearly 4 million viewers, a record for the 27-year-old fin frenzy.Specialists in shark behavior, however, aren’t as thrilled. They say that although Shark Week promotes public interest in sharks, the programs often misrepresent what scientists know about the animals and how they study them. Researchers also worry that Shark Week sends mixed messages that may hurt conservation efforts.On the positive side, says Yannis Papastamatiou, a marine biologist at the University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom, “it is quite possible that Shark Week deserves some credit” for “a big change in public opinion over the last 15 years” that has made sharks less alien and threatening to many people. But a downside, he adds, is that the documentaries often exaggerate researchers’ knowledge of shark behavior. The result: The public comes away believing that scientists know much more about sharks than they actually do. That misperception may be one reason researchers can have trouble getting funding for studies of shark behavior, says Christopher Lowe, a marine biologist at California State University, Long Beach, and president of the American Elasmobranch Society. Shark-sighting statistics, for instance, promote the idea that sharks are most active at dawn and dusk, but there’s very little scientific evidence supporting the idea. When Lowe and his colleagues proposed to study the issue, however, “We were told: ‘Well, don’t we already know the answer to that question?’ ”Researchers also complain that Shark Week veers into hype and pseudoscience. Last year, a program titled “Megalodon: The Monster Shark Lives” claimed the ancient shark may still be alive and hungry in ocean waters. This year, Shark Week aired the faux documentary “Shark of Darkness: Wrath of Submarine,” about a supposedly submarine-sized great white shark that attacked people off South African coasts.One big problem, researchers say, is that Shark Week’s emphasis on shark attacks raises a thorny question for conservation: Can people become enthusiastic about protecting something they’re afraid of? “Most [shark] species are suffering some level of decline,” says George Burgess, director of shark research at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville. About one-half of the world’s some 465 species of sharks are considered threatened or endangered. But “it’s hard to get people to rally around a species or a population that’s been impacted,” Lowe says, “if they fear them.”last_img read more

Spoken language could tap into universal code

first_img M. Perlman et al., R. Soc. Open sci. 2 (2015) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Results from the word invention study. Researchers measured five different qualities for each word: duration (D), harmonics-to-noise ratio (H), intensity (I), pitch (P), and pitch change (C). The red line shows how much average speakers emphasized one of these qualities in a word, compared with its counterpart. The up and down arrows show qualities that differed reliably between opposites. Surprisingly enough, the partners scored better than chance on the first round. And during subsequent rounds of the game, students got faster and more accurate at guessing which word was being created. Analyzing the data, author Marcus Perlman—a cognitive scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison—says the guessers were successful because the inventors consistently used certain types of vocalizations with certain words. For example, made-up words for “up” had a rising pitch, whereas made-up words for “down” had a falling pitch. “Slow” had a long duration and a low pitch, whereas “fast” had a short duration and high pitch. And “smooth” had a high degree of harmonicity, whereas “rough” had a high degree of the opposite quality—noise. Overall, each of the new words varied reliably from its opposite in at least one feature, and 57% of the words had unique prosodic “calling cards.” We know a lot about language, but we know very little about how speech developed. Did we start with gesturing and grunts? Beating our chests and pointing? Most linguists agree that some combination of movement and sound probably got us started. But how did we decide which sounds to use for various words? Now, an experimental game has shown that speakers of English might use qualities like the pitch and volume of sounds to describe concepts like size and distance when they invent new words. If true, some of our modern words may have originated from so-called iconic, rather than arbitrary, expression—a finding that would overturn a key theory of language evolution.For years, mainstream linguists have said that most of the sounds we use have no meaning. A few words—think “splash” and “bow-wow” in English—clearly have their origins in the noises of the natural world, and the universal “mama” might be the result of an infant puckering up for a kiss of milk. These kinds of words have what linguists refer to as iconicity—the ability to evoke an image in the mind’s eye. But the vast majority of words, from “fish” to “sushi,” are arbitrary. Or at least that’s what linguists thought.To explore the idea, researchers asked pairs of students at the University of California, Santa Cruz, to invent new words for 18 contrasting ideas: up, down, big, small, good, bad, fast, slow, far, near, few, many, long, short, rough, smooth, attractive, and ugly. Their partners then had 10 seconds to guess which one of the ideas the “word inventors” were describing. The students weren’t allowed to use body language or facial expressions though they were sitting face to face, and they weren’t allowed to use sounds related to similar English words. Perhaps more surprising, when Perlman ran a second experiment with subjects recruited from a labor crowdsourcing website, they also guessed better than chance when listening to sample vocalizations. Their guesses were not nearly as good as the face-to-face participants—35.6% right versus 82.2%—but they had only one round in which to make their guess.“It’s interesting to me that people are so consistent in their ideas of how to express these different meanings,” Perlman says. “[Students playing the game] are nervous at first, and they don’t have any idea of how to express these meanings the first time through. But, lo and behold, they are actually very consistent in what they do. They all share similar intuitions.”This isn’t the first time that sound has been linked to meaning. In a series of cross-linguistic experiments, researchers have demonstrated something they call the “kiki-bouba” effect. Subjects consistently link round objects with rounded, back vowels (like the “ou” in bouba), and they link sharp, angular objects with unrounded, frontal vowels (like the “ee” sound in kiki). And developmental studies have shown that children often grasp iconic words first, whether they are using spoken language or sign language. Sotaro Kita, a psycholinguist at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom who was not involved in the study, says the Perlman work is “theoretically very important,” and could “knock out” a common explanation for language evolution: that humans developed gestural language first, and only much later moved on to spoken language. Instead, says Kita, it is much likelier that gestures and spoken language evolved in lockstep.“This study is informative about how language might have emerged because it asks people to create acoustic labels for different concepts,” Kita says. “So there is a kind of universal code that people are tapping into to express these concepts.”Of course, the study used only native English speakers, and Kita says it’s crucial to test speakers of other languages to see if the findings hold. Perlman is already taking that advice to heart. Recently, he ran a similar study among deaf children at a boarding school in rural China. He found that the deaf children and their hearing counterparts, all native Mandarin speakers, consistently used longer and louder sounds to make up words for big objects and shorter and softer to make up words for small objects. There was one difference from the English-language speakers: They used higher pitches for bigger objects and lower pitches for smaller objects. Perlman suspects the tendency may have something to do with Chinese folk performances, which use high pitch to express strength and power.University College London psycholinguist Gabriella Vigliocco praises Perlman’s work with the English speakers and says that future studies should also expand the classes of words used in the experiment. “From the data they have, there’s a big jump to the conclusions that they are making. But you have to start somewhere. I’m quite sympathetic with the conclusions.”last_img read more

How did animals get their skeletons

first_imgAnimals with skeletons did not exist before about 550 million years ago. Then, scientists have proposed, atmospheric oxygen levels rose and the chemistry of the oceans changed in such a way that animals could harness the minerals required to build hard structural parts. A new analysis of ancient rock layers in Siberia provides support for this idea, showing that the oceans became rich in skeletal building blocks around the same time the first fossils of animals with skeletons start to appear.     “This paper goes a lot of the way toward answering the question of why animals first grew skeletons, and evolved into the animals that we have today,” says Ashleigh Hood, a sedimentologist at Yale University who was not involved in the study.The atmosphere today is about 20% oxygen, but that was not always the case. Before about 800 million years ago, it was as low as 0.1% of present day levels. Then, for reasons not fully understood by geologists, oxygen levels started climbing. Rachel Wood The limestone at the field site contains the minerals aragonite and calcite, which animals need to build skeletons; aragonite and calcite crystals form much faster and with less energy than dolomite, allowing animals to harness them for skeleton building in a way they can’t with dolomite. Also, on land, agents of erosion like wind and rain bombarded the continents at unusually high rates. This caused one particular nutrient needed for the formation of calcite and aragonite—calcium—to flood the oceans, which further fueled the evolution of skeletons, the team reports this month in Geology. This skeletal revolution is reflected in the rocks themselves. In the dolomite-rich layers, the fossils of soft-bodied organisms predominate—like Aspidella, a soft, frond-shaped creature that anchored itself to the seafloor. Then, in the limestone, one of the first known skeletonized animals appears—Cloudina, a millimeter-scale creature made of a calcified shell that looks like a stack of ice cream cones. From such beginnings, skeletonized animals would go on to evolve into such familiar forms as fish, shellfish, dinosaurs, and, eventually, humans.Hood praises the authors for showing how rising oxygen levels, ocean chemistry, and life changed in a coordinated way. The team is “linking three separate paths,” she says. Both Hood and Wood agree that, now that this story is known from Siberia, the next thing to do is to see if the tale holds true at other sites around the world. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) To understand the link between rising oxygen levels and the evolution of skeletons, Rachel Wood, a geobiologist at the University of Edinburgh, and her team studied ancient rock layers found deep in Siberia’s wilderness near the Yudoma River. The rocks, formed from layers of sediment deposited in ancient oceans, contain not only fossils but also sedimentary clues to how the oceans’ chemistry shifted during the time when skeletons are thought to have arisen. Wood spotted a series of ocean chemistry shifts during the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, which together stretch from about 635 to 485 million years ago. Until roughly 545 million years ago, the rocks are rich in the mineral dolomite, which is believed to have formed in the oceans when oxygen levels were low, Hood says. After that, as levels of atmospheric oxygen increased, limestone rock predominates. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Collecting samples at Nuuchchalakh Valley, Yudoma River in Siberia in Russia.last_img read more

French physicist accused of plagiarism seems set to lose prestigious job

first_imgKlein says any mistakes were due to “carelessness or negligence, not a conscious desire to plagiarize.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country French physicist accused of plagiarism seems set to lose prestigious job Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Emailcenter_img By Martin EnserinkApr. 6, 2017 , 10:30 AM In November, the weekly magazine L’Express reported that Klein had copied passages from French and foreign authors—including Émile Zola, Stefan Zweig, and Bertrand Russell—in a recent biography of Albert Einstein and in several other publications. Klein defended some of the instances but admitted he had made “mistakes” in others; a few days later, L’Express published seven more examples of alleged plagiarism, to which Klein has not responded.CEA has not investigated the matter. Although the agency features a list of Klein’s books about science and time on its website, a spokesperson says Klein wrote the disputed publications on his own time, not as a CEA researcher. “This is a private matter,” the spokesperson says.That’s why Mandon asked an independent four-member panel chaired by Michel Cosnard, president of the French High Council for Evaluation of Research and Higher Education (HCERES), to investigate the accusations. Cosnard says the commission finished its work late January and presented its report to Mandon. Then nothing happened for almost 2 months—until Klein published his open letter on 29 March.In the letter, he quoted a few paragraphs from the report in which the commission said it had not found ethical breaches in Klein’s work for CEA, and that it was “not competent,” and hadn’t been asked to judge whether Klein committed plagiarism in the legal sense. Nonetheless, the commission recommended that he step down from IHEST, Klein wrote, “so as not to cause difficulties for the institute and its important missions.” Klein says he has no intention of doing so. “I don’t want to be judged by the press, but according to the criteria of French law,” he wrote in an email.Cosnard says he can’t discuss the report; he says he hopes Mandon will make it public. But he confirms that the panel did not wade into the issue of whether Klein’s reuse of other writers broke any laws. “Klein came to the commission with his lawyer,” he says. “We’re not judges, we’re not the police. We’re just four academics.”Klein says that his book about Einstein contains more than 120 attributed quotes as well, which “proves that I have no problem with quoting someone. What I am being blamed for is due to carelessness or negligence, especially in my file management, not to a conscious desire to plagiarize.”In a story published last week, L’Express speculates that Klein’s open letter may have been a last-ditch effort to avert his dismissal or delay a decision until after the upcoming elections, in the hope that a new president might save him. But Klein says he’s not aware of any decision to fire him. He says he went public because he had expected the commission to publicly reaffirm his scientific integrity. “That was a key issue for me,” Klein says. “When nothing happened in that regard, I decided to speak out myself.”As it happens, HCERES will be home to a new French Office of Scientific Integrity (OFIS), announced by Mandon on 22 March. Cosnard says it would not have made a difference for Klein’s case if OFIS had been created earlier; the agency’s mission is to serve as a center of expertise, debate, and assistance for research institutes, but it won’t investigate individual cases of alleged misconduct such as Klein’s. Étienne Klein, a celebrated French physicist and popularizer of science, seems set to lose his post as president of the Institute for Advanced Studies for Science and Technology (IHEST) in Paris after allegations that he plagiarized more than a dozen scientists, philosophers, and writers in books and articles. A source at France’s science and education ministry yesterday confirmed to ScienceInsider that a decree ending Klein’s tenure has been signed by Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem and State Secretary Thierry Mandon and is now awaiting the signature of French President François Hollande.But Klein says he refuses to leave. In an open letter published last week, he wrote that an investigative panel that looked into the matter at Mandon’s request has found no evidence of misconduct and that he sees no reason to step down. “My scientific integrity is absolute,” Klein wrote to ScienceInsider in an email. The report has not been made public.Klein leads a small group studying science itself at the Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) near Paris, but rarely publishes in the scientific literature; his fame stems from books and articles in popular magazines, mostly about physics. He also hosts a weekly radio show about science. Hollande appointed Klein president of IHEST—which seeks to build trust in science and to reflect on its social, economic, and political aspects—in September 2016. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Image last_img read more

Podcast Machine consciousness asteroid origins and the oldest forests

first_img This week we hear stories on sunlight pushing Mars’s flock of asteroids around, approximately 400-million-year-old trees that grew by splitting their guts, and why fighting poverty might also mean worsening climate change with Online News Editor David Grimm.Sarah Crespi talks with cognitive neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene of the Collège de France in Paris about consciousness—what is it and can machines have it?For our monthly books segment, Jen Golbeck reviews astronaut Scott Kelly’s book Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery.Listen to previous podcasts.[Image: NASA/Goddard; Music: Jeffrey Cook]​ NASA/Goddard last_img read more

Kristina Olson is first psychologist to win NSFs Waterman award

first_img Even so, Olson is far from satisfied by that impressive string of firsts. “I don’t think a woman of color has ever won,” she says. (Two black scientists, both men, have been honored.) “My goal is to use the money to move us in new directions, because things aren’t going to just change on their own. And unless we make room for all of the best people, it will be hard to make progress on any of society’s problems.”Redefining early careerNSF’s selection committee had no doubts that Olson deserved this year’s prize. “Kristina Olson’s research on bias has been identified as enlarging our perspective on how people, cultures, and nations relate to one another,” says Gary May, chair of the panel and chancellor of the University of California, Davis. “She was a unanimous choice for this prestigious recognition.”Even so, Olson wouldn’t have won without NSF’s new rules on eligibility, which went into effect for the 2018 competition. Candidates can now be 10 years out from finishing their Ph.D., not just seven, and NSF raised the maximum age from 35 to 40. The changes are designed to level the playing field for researchers whose careers may have been slower to take off because of family obligations, financial pressures, or physical challenges. Olson is 36, and she earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2008.The more flexible definition of an early-career scientist may also have given Olson a few more years to overcome common misconceptions about the award. “I didn’t even know that psychologists were eligible,” she confesses. “I had assumed it was just for mathematicians or physicists. Nobody in my field had ever won the Waterman, so people never even talked about it.”Another unwritten rule about the Waterman is that it goes to a narrow stereotype of a scientist. “Some people say that the Waterman is for prodigies, as if you come out of the womb knowing how to do brilliant science,” she says.Paleoclimatologist Kim Cobb has spent years trying to erase those misconceptions. One of a handful of professors at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta with the remit to improve gender equity, Cobb has campaigned for more women to be considered for all manner of professional awards. And she says Olson’s selection shatters multiple myths.“I’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting, and now I can finally breathe,” Cobb says. “She’s an amazing role model. This news makes my day. It may even make my decade.”Support for studentsOlson has been on a fast track since coming to UW in 2013 from Yale University: She was awarded tenure last year and hopes to go up for full professor next year. Her research has focused on how children learn pro-social behavior, their attitudes toward inequity, and their understanding of social categories.She’s probably best known for her TransYouth Project. Begun in 2013, it’s the first-ever longitudinal study of a large group of transgender children. A 2016 paper found that children who had socially transitioned were no more likely to show signs of depression than a control group. Those preliminary results suggest that the conventional wisdom about the propensity of mental health problems among these children may be incorrect.Winning the Waterman prize will allow Olson to expand the study to include children who are gender nonconforming and those in the process of transitioning. The award will also give her the chance to promote the cause of diversity within the scientific workforce. Specifically, she wants to create a summer program for students underrepresented in science—by gender, race and ethnicity, physical ability, and sexual orientation—to do research across the UW campus. Undergraduates are already a staple in her Social Cognitive Development Lab, and she believes many of her colleagues are eager to make a similar commitment to diversity.“NSF’s programs align with my work in advancing science and the people who do science,” she says. “So I’m really excited to have a platform to make changes in how we view science. I take that very seriously.” Kristina Olson is first psychologist to win NSF’s Waterman award Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Calling Kristina Olson a path-breaking researcher doesn’t begin to describe all the doors this year’s winner of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) most prestigious prize for young scientists has opened.A social and developmental psychologist at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Olson is the first person from her discipline to win the 42-year-old Alan T. Waterman Award. She’s also the first woman since 2004 to receive the $1 million prize. Although scientists from every field that NSF supports are eligible, only three social scientists—the previous two were men—have ever captured the Waterman, named after NSF’s first director.Olson’s research on the social development of transgender youth has expanded the traditional boundaries of academic psychology. And her plans to use a big chunk of the prize money on a new summer internship program for undergraduate minority students also may be unprecedented for Waterman winners. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Kristina Olson works with a child in the Social Cognitive Development Lab at the University of Washington in Seattle. Email By Jeffrey MervisApr. 17, 2018 , 12:25 PM University of Washington last_img read more

Did a study of Indonesian people who spend most of their days

first_img By Dyna Rochmyaningsih Jul. 26, 2018 , 11:45 AM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Did a study of Indonesian people who spend most of their days under water violate ethical rules?center_img In April, a paper showing why Indonesia’s Bajau people are such great divers drew worldwide attention as a striking example of recent human evolution. But the study, published in Cell, has created a different kind of stir in Indonesia, where some say it is an example of “helicopter research” carried out by scientists from rich countries with little consideration for local regulations and needs.”Too many mistakes were made here,” says geneticist Herawati Sudoyo, who heads the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology in Jakarta. Indonesian officials say the research team failed to obtain ethical approval from a local review board and took DNA samples out of the country without the proper paperwork. And some Indonesian scientists complain that the only local researcher involved in the study had no expertise in evolution or genetics. But Eske Willerslev, director of the University of Copenhagen’s (KU’s) Centre for GeoGenetics, says the team he headed had a permit from the Indonesian government and worked hard to follow the rules. “I would never participate in research that I felt was unethical,” Willerslev says. The government hasn’t informed him about problems, he says, but, “If we have made an error that violates national or international guidelines, we would like to apologize for that.”The issue escalated in late May, when Pradiptajati Kusuma, a geneticist at the Eijkman Institute who has also studied the Bajau, suggested in a tweet that the team could have faced prosecution under strict new rules on foreign research, proposed by the Indonesian government and now under debate. “Jail? Possible,” Kusuma wrote. He later deleted the tweet, but Melissa Ilardo, the Cell study’s first author, says she was so rattled that she canceled a July trip to Indonesia during which she planned to inform the Bajau about her study. “I did everything I could to conduct this research ethically and properly, and this is breaking my heart,” says Ilardo, a Ph.D. student at KU at the time of the fieldwork and now at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. MATTHIEU PALEY/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE A controversial study showed that the Bajau are good divers thanks in part to an enlarged spleen. Sometimes called sea nomads, the Bajau have lived off the ocean for centuries; men spend much of the day underwater to spear fish and harvest sea cucumbers. In 2015, Ilardo took saliva samples from 59 Bajau individuals in Central Sulawesi and measured their spleen size. The team found that, compared with controls, the Bajau have bigger spleens, which may help prevent hypoxia during long dives by releasing extra blood cells. The researchers also identified a gene variant that may be responsible.Willerslev’s group received a permit for the study from Indonesia’s Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education, commonly known as RISTEK, in Jakarta and ethical clearance from the Danish National Committee on Health Research Ethics. “We were told that RISTEK permit included local ethical approval as well, thus there was no ethical violation,” Willerslev says.Sadjuga, secretary of RISTEK’s Foreign Research Permit Coordinating Team, disputes that account. “We always request ethical clearance from at least one Indonesian research ethics commission,” Sadjuga says. (Like many Indonesians, he uses only one name.) Triono Soendoro, who heads the Ethical Commission for National Health Research and Development at the Indonesian Ministry of Health in Jakarta, confirms that the team should have had approval from an ethical panel in Indonesia; guidelines from the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences also call for local approval.The team may also have run afoul of regulations when it shipped DNA samples to Copenhagen for analysis. Ilardo says she filed a material transfer agreement (MTA)—a contract governing the shipment of research samples—with her application to RISTEK. But for the transfer of human DNA, she should have sought approval from the National Institute of Health Research and Development in Jakarta, says Siswanto, who chairs that institute. “If this was a requirement, I would have expected that RISTEK would have told me if my MTA was invalid when I submitted it,” Ilardo says.Some Indonesian scientists, meanwhile, are miffed that the only Indonesian name on the paper is that of Suhartini Salingkat, an education researcher at Tompotika Luwuk Banggai University, a small private institution in Central Sulawesi; according to the paper, she “provided logistical support.” Foreign teams “should involve Indonesian scientists in all stages of research,” says Mohamad Belaffif, an Indonesian bioinformatician at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville, Alabama.Ilardo says she did try to collaborate with scientists at the Eijkman Institute after RISTEK requested she do so. An email exchange between Ilardo and Sudoyo, provided to Science by Willerslev, shows Sudoyo didn’t respond to several requests for a meeting in October 2015, before fieldwork began, and later effectively declined a partnership. “As far as I understand, you have your own partner already in the Bajau project, therefore we are not needed,” she wrote. (Sudoyo declined to answer Science’s questions on this matter.) Given Ilardo’s overtures to the Eijkman Institute, “I would love to understand what went wrong and why they suddenly are so angry,” says Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, another senior author on the paper.Ilardo says she shared her genetic expertise with Tompotika students in an informal seminar, and made the partnership worthwhile for Salingkat by helping her with a research paper. In Ilardo’s application to RISTEK, she also promised to organize a meeting with the Bajau people to tell them about the results of the study. But even if she hadn’t abandoned that plan following Kusuma’s tweet, some argue it would have been too late. “In general, the return [of research results] should coincide with or slightly precede publication so that the participants are not the last to know,” says Conrad Fernandez, a bioethicist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Canada.Berry Juliandi, a biologist at Bogor Agricultural University in Indonesia, says the country’s “tangled” system of permits can be hard to navigate for foreign researchers. “The root of this problem is the weak management of foreign research permits in Indonesia,” he says. “How could RISTEK approve Ilardo’s permit proposal [when] she doesn’t have a valid MTA and ethical clearance from an Indonesian institution?” Working with a bigger, more experienced local institution than Tompotika might have helped the researchers avoid pitfalls, he says.The case comes at a sensitive time, when Indonesian and foreign scientists are debating rules, proposed in 2017, that would strengthen MTA regulations, compel foreign researchers to include Indonesian colleagues as “equal partners” on projects, and include them as authors on every peer-reviewed paper about the work. Outside researchers would also have to submit raw data to the country’s research ministry; some violations would carry prison sentences. Some scientists, both in Indonesia and abroad, say the law is unworkable and could stifle scientific progress. At the same time, RISTEK says it wants to promote research collaborations, and on 5 July, it launched an online system that makes the paperwork easier and less time-consuming for foreign researchers.Neither RISTEK nor the Ministry of Health has taken action against the researchers over the Bajau study. A spokesperson for Cell says the journal is satisfied by the researchers’ explanation. “The authors sent us documentation indicating that they received consent from the Indonesian government to conduct this research,” he says. “We have no evidence that further investigation of this matter is warranted.”last_img read more

Aging Voyager 1 spacecraft undermines idea that dark matter is tiny black

first_img Aging Voyager 1 spacecraft undermines idea that dark matter is tiny black holes Humanity’s most far-flung spacecraft, NASA’s 41-year-old Voyager 1, has poked a hole in a long-shot theory of dark matter. Some theorists have argued that the mysterious, unseen stuff, which makes up 85% of the universe’s matter, could consist of countless black holes lingering from the big bang. But Voyager 1, which launched in 1977 and slipped out of the solar system 6 years ago, sees no signs of such hordes, a pair of theoretical physicists reports. The data don’t kill the idea that dark matter is black holes entirely, however, as Voyager 1 can detect only tiny black holes.“I never thought we’d be able to contribute in any way to studying dark matter,” says Alan Cummings, a space scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena who has worked on Voyager 1 since 1973 and who was not involved in the analysis. “That’s great!”For decades, astrophysicists have thought some sort of unseen matter provides the gravity needed to hold galaxies like our Milky Way together. For nearly as long, some scientists have speculated that dark matter might consist of black holes, knots of ultraintense gravitational fields typically created when massive stars collapse under their own weight to infinitesimal points. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) An illustration of Voyager 1, now 21.7 billion kilometers awaycenter_img JPL Caltech/NASA By Adrian ChoJan. 9, 2019 , 2:25 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe But making black holes work as dark matter is tricky. In the universe, dark matter outweighs ordinary matter six to one, and there can’t have been enough collapsing stars to produce that lopsided ratio. So the black holes would have had to arise in a different way, through the collapse of tiny fluctuations in the soup of fundamental particles that filled the newborn universe long before stars formed. Such primordial black holes could have nearly any mass, but they cannot be too abundant without running afoul of astronomical observations. For example, throngs of black holes much more massive than the sun would shred galaxies like cannon balls crashing through chandeliers. Hordes of smaller black holes should distort the images of more distant stars and galaxy through so-called gravitational lensing.Such observations leave just three possible mass ranges for primordial black holes, says Bernard Carr, a cosmologist at Queen Mary University of London, who has worked on the idea for 40 years. They could have masses between one and 10 times that of the sun; about one-billionth that of the sun; or below about a quadrillionth that of the sun—10 billion metric tons. Those smallest black holes would only be as wide as an atomic nucleus.But if they’re there, the tiny black holes should produce a telltale radiation that Voyager 1 should see, argue Mathieu Boudaud and Marco Cirelli, theorists at Sorbonne University in Paris, in a paper in press at Physical Review Letters. Black holes earn their name because anything that gets too close to one, even light, cannot escape. However, in 1973, the late Stephen Hawking reasoned that black holes should radiate some light and particles nonetheless.According to quantum mechanics, empty space roils with particle-antiparticle pairs flitting into and out of existence. Hawking realized that if such a pair pops into existence at just the right distance from a black hole then one particle might fall into the black hole while the other flies away in what is now called Hawking radiation. The smaller the black hole, the hotter it would be and the more it would radiate.Tiny black holes weighing 10 billion metric tons should be hot enough to radiate electrons and positrons. Earth-bound detectors would not be able to spot those low-energy particles, as they would be deflected by the sun’s magnetic field. But Voyager 1 should be able to spot them from its position outside the sun’s magnetic bubble, the heliosphere.In fact, since it exited the heliosphere in 2012, Voyager 1 has measured a small, consistent flux of positrons and electrons. But even if they all come from tiny black holes, there wouldn’t be enough black holes to account for more than 1% of the Milky Way’s dark matter, Boudaud and Cirelli calculate. Cummings says the energy spectrum of the particles suggests they all come from more mundane sources such as the remnants of supernova explosions.The new work comes close to ruling out the lowest mass primordial black holes as dark matter, Carr says, although he adds that he has always favored the scenario in which the black holes weigh several solar masses. “This [low] mass window has never been my favorite,” he says. “It doesn’t personally bother me if the constraints now rule it out.”Voyager 1 can’t search for the higher mass primordial black holes. They would be so heavy and cold that they could not radiate massive particles such as electrons and positrons. Instead, they would only shine an exceedingly feeble and likely undetectable light. So, for the moment, the idea of black hole dark matter lives on.last_img read more

Podcast spotting slavery from space and using iPads for communication disorders

first_imgILO in Asia and the Pacific/Flickr In our first segment from the annual meeting of AAAS (Science’s publisher) in Washington, D.C., host Sarah Crespi talks with Cathy Binger of University of New Mexico in Albuquerque about her session on the role of modern technology, such as iPads and apps, in helping people with communication disorders. It turns out that there’s no killer app, but some devices do help normalize assistive technology for kids.Also this week, freelance journalist Sarah Scoles joins Sarah Crespi to talk about bringing together satellite imaging, machine learning, and nonprofits to put a stop to modern-day slavery.In our monthly books segment, books editor Valerie Thompson talks with Judy Grisel about her book Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction, including discussions of Gisel’s personal experience with addiction and how it has informed her research as a neuroscientist.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download the transcript (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: ILO in Asia and the Pacific/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]last_img read more

US judge rules deceptive publisher should pay 50 million in damages

first_img U.S. judge rules deceptive publisher should pay $50 million in damages carolo7/iStockphoto Navarro said she based the $50.1 million judgment on the company’s total revenues from 2011 to 2017, less chargebacks and refunds. Under the relevant consumer law, FTC didn’t have to prove how many authors were misled by OMICS, which published its first journal online in 2008.“Defendants did not participate in an isolated, discrete incident of deceptive publishing, but rather sustained and continuous conduct over the course of years,” she wrote.The case was heard in Nevada because OMICS is legally incorporated there, despite its physical headquarters in India. Besides OMICS, other defendants included two subsidiaries incorporated in Delaware; and OMICS’s founder and owner, Srinubabu Gedala, a former biomedical researcher.OMICS plans to appeal, wrote its lawyer, Kishore Vattikoti of Hyderabad, in an email. He called the summary judgment without trial “unjustifiable.”It remains to be seen whether any researcher deceived by OMICS will receive money from the judgment. FTC knows of and will investigate U.S. financial accounts of OMICS, but does not yet know whether they contain any money, said Gregory Ashe, its staff attorney on the case, in an interview Wednesday with ScienceInsider. FTC has an international office that works with other nations to collect judgments from overseas accounts, but that work for this judgment is only now beginning, he said.FTC has a database of authors who submitted manuscripts to journal articles whom it will contact if it recovers funds to share, Ashe said. Scholars who want to ensure that FTC knows of their claims can file a complaint through the agency’s website. Anyone worldwide can submit a claim.“The FTC is closely monitoring this industry,” Ashe said, “and we’re hoping that the decision sends a warning shot across the bow of would-be predatory or deceptive publishers to tread carefully. Re-evaluate the claims that you’re making [so] you’re not making claims that are not true.”Ashe wouldn’t say whether FTC is actively investigating other predatory publishers. But OMICS appears to have plenty of company: A 2015 study in BMC Medicine estimated that questionable publishers issued nearly half a million articles in 2014 and took in about $75 million. 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Country By Jeffrey BrainardApr. 3, 2019 , 5:00 PM A U.S. federal judge has ordered the OMICS International publishing group to pay $50.1 million in damages for deceiving thousands of authors who published in its journals and attended its conferences. It’s one of the first rulings of its kind against one of the largest publishers accused of so-called predatory tactics.But because it’s a U.S. judgment and OMICS is based in Hyderabad, India, it’s not clear that any money will be collected or shared with researchers who claim OMICS deceived them.Judge Gloria Navarro of the U.S. District Court in Las Vegas, Nevada, granted summary judgment without a trial, accepting as uncontroverted a set of allegations made in 2016 by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in Washington, D.C., in its capacity as a consumer watchdog. The ruling also bars OMICS from similar future conduct. OMICS, which publishes about 700 journals in scientific and other fields, advertised deceptively that it provided authors with rigorous peer review overseen by editorial boards. Instead, its journals approved many articles for publication in a matter of days with no substantive feedback to authors, FTC alleged. The judge relied in part on the findings of an investigation published by Science in 2013; its author, journalist John Bohannon, submitted a deposition to the court. Of 69,000 manuscripts published by OMICS from 2011 to 2017, the publisher provided evidence that only half had been sent out for peer review. Despite this lack of actual peer review, OMICS’s solicitations to authors didn’t make it clear enough that it would charge them to publish articles in its open-access journals. Some authors complained and asked OMICS to withdraw their articles, but OMICS refused, preventing authors from submitting them to other publications. OMICS advertised its 50,000 reviewers as experts, but some never agreed to serve, and OMICS continued to publicly list some scientists as reviewers even after they asked to be removed. The publisher advertised that its journals had high impact factors, a measure of their editorial quality. But it didn’t sufficiently reveal that OMICS itself generated its own “unofficial impact factor” for some of its journals based on citations in Google Scholar. OMICS also incorrectly stated that its journals are indexed in the U.S. National Library of Medicine’s Medline and PubMedCentral. OMICS organized scholarly conferences and advertised that prominent academics would attend. But a sampling of 100 conferences indicated that 60% named organizers or participants who had not agreed to serve in that capacity. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more